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March 2017 Archives

Death of a parent and child custody

If a North Carolina father is not the custodial parent and the custodial parent dies, he may want to get custody of the child. However, if his name is not on the child's birth certificate or if he has not filed a signed acknowledgement of paternity with the court, he must first establish paternity.

Learning more about the DPPA

The Deadbeat Parents Punishment Act is a federal law that levies penalties against noncustodial parents who move to another state in an effort to avoid their child support obligations. Created in 1998, it says that North Carolina residents or others may be subject to prison time in addition to paying back child support owed. The DPPA may apply to any parent who has moved to another state and has failed to make payments for more than a year totaling more than $5,000.

Residence a factor in Scarlett Johansson custody dispute

North Carolina residents may have been surprised in January when media outlets reported that the marriage between actress Scarlett Johansson and her husband was ending after less than two years. The couple has a 2-year-old daughter, and legal experts believe that establishing residence for the child will be a key factor in what some fear could be a contentious custody dispute. Speculation about the couple's situation was put to rest on March 7 when Johansson filed divorce papers in New York City.

Divorce can be particularly difficult for children

For many North Carolina parents, hashing out child custody details can be one of the most difficult parts of the divorce. However, the divorce can be particularly difficult for the kids, especially if their parents cannot work together or spend their time arguing. To make the transition easier for the children, there are certain things that parents can do.

Child support payments, paternal time with children linked

Fathers in North Carolina who do not pay child support might also spend less time with their children. This includes everyday activities such as helping children with their homework. Those fathers are also less likely to offer in-kind items such as medicine or clothes.

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